GeoSolutions » Blog https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com Your one-stop-shop for geospatial open source software Thu, 30 Jul 2020 07:33:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.28 MapStore – Sleek Open Source WebGIS – Webinar https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/mapstore-webinar-202008/ https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/mapstore-webinar-202008/#comments Mon, 20 Jul 2020 15:54:10 +0000 http://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/?p=5444 MapStore GeoStory

Dear Reader,

Web GIS applications have hugely evolved in the last decades. The first web map server was made available early in the 90's, and since then we've since an explosion of companies and application that help use understand what can we find in a place, where is a place that meets my conditions, where is the best route, and so on. The speed of computers and internet has empowered developers to make faster and better applications that run in personal computers and mobile devices. Most of these applications provide a map,  a list of categories, a search interface and maybe a menu that allows the user to run some analysis.

At the same time, the power for people around the world to communicate has increased.  We now share blogs, videos and images, almost becoming part of our daily live. What if we want to share a story but also combining geospatial data? This will allow us to provide a geospatial context to the information that we want to convey. At the same time, it will allow us to enrich Web GIS clients by providing multimedia content that is hard to convey with only maps.

MapStore with its most recent release allows to develop GeoStories in a very easy way. It allows to combine the power of interactive maps and charts with text, images and videos. I invite you to see a demo GeoStory at the MapStore demo website.

[caption id="attachment_5473" align="aligncenter" width="800"]MapStore Dashboards Screenshot from our demo GeoStory[/caption]

Other tools exist that do the same, but MapStore is unique because of these combined functionalities:

  • It allows to create GeoStories combining dynamic maps and charts with text, images and videos
  • It is Open Source (Simplified BSD license)
  • The data that creates the maps and dashboard comes via OGC Open Standards (WMS, WFS)
  • It is based on fast  web popular technology: OpenLayers, Leaflet, Cesium and ReactJS
  • Has a powerful editor
  • It allows to configure users and groups
  • Provides the capabilities to share maps and stories to be embedded in other web pages or as single web applications
A recent GeoSolutions blog covers the new functionality of MapStore based on the 2020_02_00 release. We are hosting a webinar on Aug 3rd that will introduce MapStore, the latest bells and whistles from this release and will provide you guidance on how to get started.
I cordially invite you to a free webinar on Monday Aug 3rd at 11:00 Eastern Time (5 PM CEST) by registering at the link below!
register
Hope to see you virtually on Aug 3rd, meanwhile stay safe and keep strong! Cordially, Luis 320x100_eng]]>
MapStore GeoStory

Dear Reader,

Web GIS applications have hugely evolved in the last decades. The first web map server was made available early in the 90's, and since then we've since an explosion of companies and application that help use understand what can we find in a place, where is a place that meets my conditions, where is the best route, and so on. The speed of computers and internet has empowered developers to make faster and better applications that run in personal computers and mobile devices. Most of these applications provide a map,  a list of categories, a search interface and maybe a menu that allows the user to run some analysis.

At the same time, the power for people around the world to communicate has increased.  We now share blogs, videos and images, almost becoming part of our daily live. What if we want to share a story but also combining geospatial data? This will allow us to provide a geospatial context to the information that we want to convey. At the same time, it will allow us to enrich Web GIS clients by providing multimedia content that is hard to convey with only maps.

MapStore with its most recent release allows to develop GeoStories in a very easy way. It allows to combine the power of interactive maps and charts with text, images and videos. I invite you to see a demo GeoStory at the MapStore demo website.

[caption id="attachment_5473" align="aligncenter" width="800"]MapStore Dashboards Screenshot from our demo GeoStory[/caption]

Other tools exist that do the same, but MapStore is unique because of these combined functionalities:

  • It allows to create GeoStories combining dynamic maps and charts with text, images and videos
  • It is Open Source (Simplified BSD license)
  • The data that creates the maps and dashboard comes via OGC Open Standards (WMS, WFS)
  • It is based on fast  web popular technology: OpenLayers, Leaflet, Cesium and ReactJS
  • Has a powerful editor
  • It allows to configure users and groups
  • Provides the capabilities to share maps and stories to be embedded in other web pages or as single web applications
A recent GeoSolutions blog covers the new functionality of MapStore based on the 2020_02_00 release. We are hosting a webinar on Aug 3rd that will introduce MapStore, the latest bells and whistles from this release and will provide you guidance on how to get started.
I cordially invite you to a free webinar on Monday Aug 3rd at 11:00 Eastern Time (5 PM CEST) by registering at the link below!
register
Hope to see you virtually on Aug 3rd, meanwhile stay safe and keep strong! Cordially, Luis 320x100_eng]]>
https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/mapstore-webinar-202008/feed/ 1
MapStore Release 2020.02.00 https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/blog/mapstore-release-2020_02_00/ https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/blog/mapstore-release-2020_02_00/#comments Fri, 17 Jul 2020 16:58:16 +0000 http://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/?p=5371 Immagine

Dear Reader,

We are pleased to announce the release 2020.02.00 of MapStore, our flagship Open Source WebGIS product. The full list of changes for this release can be found  in the GitHub Project. This blog highlights the most interesting ones.

Important changes for this release

This release comes with many new features and functionalities. The two important ones are:

  • GeoStory: you can now create and share fascinating, interactive stories combining text, interactive maps, and other rich-multimedia content. Special thanks to the MapStore team for this.
  • Application Contexts: as administrator you can now build and configure your own map viewer, share it and create maps on it. Special thanks to the MapStore team for this too!

Other new functionalities include:

  • Click Filtering: When a user clicks on a vector feature on the map, the attribute table is filtered accordingly.
  • Measurements: A user can now measure distance, area and bearings by just drawing on the map.
  • Import/Export: A user can now import and export Web Map Context  (WMC) files, that allows to share a map context between clients. The file includes information like list of layers,  projections, coordinates, zoom and extension.
  • Catalog Tool: MapStore connects to a catalog to find services and get data or images to be added to the viewer. Tile Map Services and Web Feature Services are now supported.
  • Identify Tool: The identify popup provides more information about the feature on the map. A user can also now switch to edit mode by opening the attribute table.
  • Layer Settings: A user can now edit the legend size in MapStore, adjusting to the user needs.

Storytelling with GeoStory

Yes, finally MapStore is able to create also Stories or, better than that, GeoStories!

GeoStory is a tool that allows to create inspiring and immersive stories by combining text, interactive maps, and multimedia content (e.g. images,  video or other third party content). Through this tool you can easily tell your stories on the web, publish them, and share them. Stories can be shared with configured user groups in MapStore or publicly to everyone around the world.

[caption id="attachment_5394" align="aligncenter" width="961"]GeoStory - Sample of a story in view mode. GeoStory - Sample of a story in view mode.[/caption]

Are you still wondering what GeoStory is? Well, it provides capabilities to tell a geospatial story using existing resource types in MapStore (i.e. Maps and Dashboards). You will notice that a new button is available in the MapStore homepage that allows you to create a GeoStory .

[caption id="attachment_5375" align="aligncenter" width="272"]2020-07-10 16_25_51-MapStore HomePage.jpg Creating a new GeoStory[/caption]

If you click on it, MapStore brings you to the GeoStory editor: an advanced web editor that provides a well-stocked set of tools to configure your story. Through this amazing tool, you can build your story by adding different kind of sections, one after the other, organized in a continuous scrolling layout (Scrollytelling). You can add and configure the following sections:

A Media Editor gives you the possibility to easily manage your media so that you can include Images, Videos as well as Maps

[caption id="attachment_5395" align="aligncenter" width="870"]GeoStory - Media Editor. GeoStory - Media Editor.[/caption]

You can add one of the existing maps in a story or create a new one directly inside the GeoStory editor. In addition you are given the possibility to quickly edit your Map section with an easy to use Map Inline Editor.

[caption id="attachment_5396" align="aligncenter" width="848"]GeoStory - Advanced map editor inside a story. GeoStory - Advanced map editor inside a story.[/caption]

GeoStory gives you control over the sections created through an action toolbar, one per section, as shown in the image below. The action toolbar allows you to perform quick actions on your section's content.

[caption id="attachment_5397" align="aligncenter" width="933"]GeoStory - Section toolbars available GeoStory - Section toolbars available[/caption]

Moreover, the GeoStory editor gives you control over other story parameters and settings through a side panel where you can freely organize your sections by simply using drag&drop. Here you can:

  • Scroll to a specific section or rename the section itself, drag and drop a section to change its position inside the story
[caption id="attachment_5384" align="aligncenter" width="596"]GeoStory - Zom to a section or rename it GeoStory - Side Panel, zoom to a section or rename it[/caption]
  • Open the story settings to configure things like the story theme, the navigation toolbar or other settings as shown below
[caption id="attachment_5398" align="aligncenter" width="346"]GeoStory - Settings of a Story GeoStory - Settings of a Story[/caption]

Last but not the least, you can manage your stories, in a similar way that you are already use to do, with Maps and Dashboards. You can manage permissions for specific groups of users, you can share your storyand more. A sample of a StoryMap is available in our MapStore live demo here (you can login with user demo and password 123demoUser).

Special thanks to the Neftex Petroleum Consultants Limited, who funded this new feature.

Creating custom viewers with the Application Context

The Application Context Manager is an administrative tool designed to build and configure different MapStore viewer configurations for the same MapStore installation. Through a multisteps wizard the administrator is able to configure a custom MapStore viewer by choosing:

  • The name of the context (the viewer will have its own specific URL)
  • The default map configuration and map contents (like layers, backgrounds, catalog sources, the map's CRS etc.)
  • The set of plugins available for the viewer. You can build you own custom plugin and install it in your instance directly using the wizard. We made a  sample plugin that is ready for you to test and reuse.

In previous versions of MapStore, there was only a single application configuration with the possibility to define and load additional ones with a specific URL parameter. This is still possible allowing users to define different viewer  configurations for the same MapStore instance, but this new development gives the users the possibility to manage different viewer contexts through the MapStore admin user interface.

The Application Context has been conceived to easily create multiple MapStore viewers with a single installation. Each installation has its own set of plugins, look and feel, default map contents and Viewer's URL.

A user can also create his own maps starting from a context.  A new administrative section has been added to open the application context manager from the  MapStore home page.

[caption id="attachment_5412" align="aligncenter" width="359"]Application Context - Opening the manager from home Application Context - Opening the manager from home[/caption]

The manager allows you to manage your contexts in the same way as other MapStore resources.  You can share the context, manage access permissions and properties in the same way you do for Maps, Dashboards and Stories.

[caption id="attachment_5413" align="aligncenter" width="951"]Application Context - Contexts manager Application Context - Contexts manager[/caption]

Let us now see each wizard's step in more details.

Step #1 allows MapStore administrators to setup the name of the context (it will appear in the URL of the context) and the browser's window title.

[caption id="attachment_5415" align="aligncenter" width="494"]Application Context - Step 1 of the wizard Application Context - Step #1 of the wizard[/caption]

In step #2 administrators can setup the default map contents of the context. The image below shows the available tools for setting up the default Viewer's map.

[caption id="attachment_5416" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Application Context - Step #2 of the wizard Application Context - Step #2 of the wizard[/caption]

In step #3 we can setup which plugins need to be included and enabled in the context viewer. You can:

  • Select plugins to enable
  • Go to the online plugins documentation to check available configuration properties for a specific plugin
  • Configure each plugin through a text area where you can customize its configuration properties (a validator helps you on this)
  • Mark a plugin as mandatory for the context or ready to be added/removed on the fly by the user! Look at online documentation to learn more about the user's Extension Library
  • Install your custom plugin by uploading the extension package in zip format!
[caption id="attachment_5420" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Application Context - Step #3 of the wizard Application Context - Step #3 of the wizard[/caption]

If enabled by administrators, a user can save his context maps and browse all maps available in the MapStore catalog through the Map Catalog tool. You do not need to leave the Viewer anymore to switch to other maps!

[caption id="attachment_5424" align="aligncenter" width="478"]Application Context - Map Catalog Application Context - Map Catalog[/caption]

If you want to know more about this feature, please check the online documentation which covers other functionalities not described of this blog post. For example, Map Templates are ready-made map contents that can be added to a Map.

Special thanks to Renne Métropole, who funded this new feature for the geOrchestra community. We will write a separate blog post about the adoption of MapStore as the geOrchestra viewer.

Ongoing and future work

For the next releases we are working on the following (in sparse order) functionalities:

  • Improvements of the Style Editor  to  improve the user experience when editing styles in MapStore.
[caption id="attachment_5429" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]Style Editor - Improved UI Style Editor - Improved UI[/caption]
  • Improvements on the MapStore SDK to simplify the life of developers creating downstream projects like the GeoNode integration.
  • Enhancements for the Annotations and Identify tools to improve the user experience with a new user interface and additional capabilities.

If you want to play with the current release, you can access the live demo here and login with username demo and password 123demoUser.

If you are interested in learning more about how we can help you develop a WebGIS using MapStore or help you achieve your needs related to GeoServerGeoNode and GeoNetwork through our Enterprise Support Services and Subscription Services  please contact us!

The GeoSolutions team, ]]>
Immagine

Dear Reader,

We are pleased to announce the release 2020.02.00 of MapStore, our flagship Open Source WebGIS product. The full list of changes for this release can be found  in the GitHub Project. This blog highlights the most interesting ones.

Important changes for this release

This release comes with many new features and functionalities. The two important ones are:

  • GeoStory: you can now create and share fascinating, interactive stories combining text, interactive maps, and other rich-multimedia content. Special thanks to the MapStore team for this.
  • Application Contexts: as administrator you can now build and configure your own map viewer, share it and create maps on it. Special thanks to the MapStore team for this too!

Other new functionalities include:

  • Click Filtering: When a user clicks on a vector feature on the map, the attribute table is filtered accordingly.
  • Measurements: A user can now measure distance, area and bearings by just drawing on the map.
  • Import/Export: A user can now import and export Web Map Context  (WMC) files, that allows to share a map context between clients. The file includes information like list of layers,  projections, coordinates, zoom and extension.
  • Catalog Tool: MapStore connects to a catalog to find services and get data or images to be added to the viewer. Tile Map Services and Web Feature Services are now supported.
  • Identify Tool: The identify popup provides more information about the feature on the map. A user can also now switch to edit mode by opening the attribute table.
  • Layer Settings: A user can now edit the legend size in MapStore, adjusting to the user needs.

Storytelling with GeoStory

Yes, finally MapStore is able to create also Stories or, better than that, GeoStories!

GeoStory is a tool that allows to create inspiring and immersive stories by combining text, interactive maps, and multimedia content (e.g. images,  video or other third party content). Through this tool you can easily tell your stories on the web, publish them, and share them. Stories can be shared with configured user groups in MapStore or publicly to everyone around the world.

[caption id="attachment_5394" align="aligncenter" width="961"]GeoStory - Sample of a story in view mode. GeoStory - Sample of a story in view mode.[/caption]

Are you still wondering what GeoStory is? Well, it provides capabilities to tell a geospatial story using existing resource types in MapStore (i.e. Maps and Dashboards). You will notice that a new button is available in the MapStore homepage that allows you to create a GeoStory .

[caption id="attachment_5375" align="aligncenter" width="272"]2020-07-10 16_25_51-MapStore HomePage.jpg Creating a new GeoStory[/caption]

If you click on it, MapStore brings you to the GeoStory editor: an advanced web editor that provides a well-stocked set of tools to configure your story. Through this amazing tool, you can build your story by adding different kind of sections, one after the other, organized in a continuous scrolling layout (Scrollytelling). You can add and configure the following sections:

A Media Editor gives you the possibility to easily manage your media so that you can include Images, Videos as well as Maps

[caption id="attachment_5395" align="aligncenter" width="870"]GeoStory - Media Editor. GeoStory - Media Editor.[/caption]

You can add one of the existing maps in a story or create a new one directly inside the GeoStory editor. In addition you are given the possibility to quickly edit your Map section with an easy to use Map Inline Editor.

[caption id="attachment_5396" align="aligncenter" width="848"]GeoStory - Advanced map editor inside a story. GeoStory - Advanced map editor inside a story.[/caption]

GeoStory gives you control over the sections created through an action toolbar, one per section, as shown in the image below. The action toolbar allows you to perform quick actions on your section's content.

[caption id="attachment_5397" align="aligncenter" width="933"]GeoStory - Section toolbars available GeoStory - Section toolbars available[/caption]

Moreover, the GeoStory editor gives you control over other story parameters and settings through a side panel where you can freely organize your sections by simply using drag&drop. Here you can:

  • Scroll to a specific section or rename the section itself, drag and drop a section to change its position inside the story
[caption id="attachment_5384" align="aligncenter" width="596"]GeoStory - Zom to a section or rename it GeoStory - Side Panel, zoom to a section or rename it[/caption]
  • Open the story settings to configure things like the story theme, the navigation toolbar or other settings as shown below
[caption id="attachment_5398" align="aligncenter" width="346"]GeoStory - Settings of a Story GeoStory - Settings of a Story[/caption]

Last but not the least, you can manage your stories, in a similar way that you are already use to do, with Maps and Dashboards. You can manage permissions for specific groups of users, you can share your storyand more. A sample of a StoryMap is available in our MapStore live demo here (you can login with user demo and password 123demoUser).

Special thanks to the Neftex Petroleum Consultants Limited, who funded this new feature.

Creating custom viewers with the Application Context

The Application Context Manager is an administrative tool designed to build and configure different MapStore viewer configurations for the same MapStore installation. Through a multisteps wizard the administrator is able to configure a custom MapStore viewer by choosing:

  • The name of the context (the viewer will have its own specific URL)
  • The default map configuration and map contents (like layers, backgrounds, catalog sources, the map's CRS etc.)
  • The set of plugins available for the viewer. You can build you own custom plugin and install it in your instance directly using the wizard. We made a  sample plugin that is ready for you to test and reuse.

In previous versions of MapStore, there was only a single application configuration with the possibility to define and load additional ones with a specific URL parameter. This is still possible allowing users to define different viewer  configurations for the same MapStore instance, but this new development gives the users the possibility to manage different viewer contexts through the MapStore admin user interface.

The Application Context has been conceived to easily create multiple MapStore viewers with a single installation. Each installation has its own set of plugins, look and feel, default map contents and Viewer's URL.

A user can also create his own maps starting from a context.  A new administrative section has been added to open the application context manager from the  MapStore home page.

[caption id="attachment_5412" align="aligncenter" width="359"]Application Context - Opening the manager from home Application Context - Opening the manager from home[/caption]

The manager allows you to manage your contexts in the same way as other MapStore resources.  You can share the context, manage access permissions and properties in the same way you do for Maps, Dashboards and Stories.

[caption id="attachment_5413" align="aligncenter" width="951"]Application Context - Contexts manager Application Context - Contexts manager[/caption]

Let us now see each wizard's step in more details.

Step #1 allows MapStore administrators to setup the name of the context (it will appear in the URL of the context) and the browser's window title.

[caption id="attachment_5415" align="aligncenter" width="494"]Application Context - Step 1 of the wizard Application Context - Step #1 of the wizard[/caption]

In step #2 administrators can setup the default map contents of the context. The image below shows the available tools for setting up the default Viewer's map.

[caption id="attachment_5416" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Application Context - Step #2 of the wizard Application Context - Step #2 of the wizard[/caption]

In step #3 we can setup which plugins need to be included and enabled in the context viewer. You can:

  • Select plugins to enable
  • Go to the online plugins documentation to check available configuration properties for a specific plugin
  • Configure each plugin through a text area where you can customize its configuration properties (a validator helps you on this)
  • Mark a plugin as mandatory for the context or ready to be added/removed on the fly by the user! Look at online documentation to learn more about the user's Extension Library
  • Install your custom plugin by uploading the extension package in zip format!
[caption id="attachment_5420" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Application Context - Step #3 of the wizard Application Context - Step #3 of the wizard[/caption]

If enabled by administrators, a user can save his context maps and browse all maps available in the MapStore catalog through the Map Catalog tool. You do not need to leave the Viewer anymore to switch to other maps!

[caption id="attachment_5424" align="aligncenter" width="478"]Application Context - Map Catalog Application Context - Map Catalog[/caption]

If you want to know more about this feature, please check the online documentation which covers other functionalities not described of this blog post. For example, Map Templates are ready-made map contents that can be added to a Map.

Special thanks to Renne Métropole, who funded this new feature for the geOrchestra community. We will write a separate blog post about the adoption of MapStore as the geOrchestra viewer.

Ongoing and future work

For the next releases we are working on the following (in sparse order) functionalities:

  • Improvements of the Style Editor  to  improve the user experience when editing styles in MapStore.
[caption id="attachment_5429" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]Style Editor - Improved UI Style Editor - Improved UI[/caption]
  • Improvements on the MapStore SDK to simplify the life of developers creating downstream projects like the GeoNode integration.
  • Enhancements for the Annotations and Identify tools to improve the user experience with a new user interface and additional capabilities.

If you want to play with the current release, you can access the live demo here and login with username demo and password 123demoUser.

If you are interested in learning more about how we can help you develop a WebGIS using MapStore or help you achieve your needs related to GeoServerGeoNode and GeoNetwork through our Enterprise Support Services and Subscription Services  please contact us!

The GeoSolutions team, ]]>
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GeoServer Bug Stump Code Sprint July 2-3 2020 https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/geoserver-codepsrint-202006/ https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/geoserver-codepsrint-202006/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2020 18:56:36 +0000 http://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/?p=5366 GeoServer

Dear Reader,

GeoSolutions, along with the GeoServer community, is participating in a two days long “GeoServer Bug Fix Code Sprint”, on July the 2nd and the 3rd. The sprint also happens to overlap with the Bolsena Online Code Sprint 2020, so we’ll end up sharing some of the infrastructure and enjoying the good company of other sprinters! This sprint revives and seeks to improve the old monthly bug fix code sprint, that we used to do before. From those sprints, we learned that bugs that can be assigned to less experienced developers, because they seem like a one day fix, are hard to find. That was often coupled with lower participation of experienced developers, who need to review the pull requests for the fixes, and sit on the side (now virtually) of other developers to provide guidance.

So this time the sprint is two days long. We hope to get more tickets looked at, while allowing participant developers to tackle harder to fix problems.

Please join us on the GeoServer gitter channel, and don’t forget to go say hi to the other Bolsena sprinters on the OSGeo/Sprint channel!

Cordially,

Luis 320x100_eng]]>
GeoServer

Dear Reader,

GeoSolutions, along with the GeoServer community, is participating in a two days long “GeoServer Bug Fix Code Sprint”, on July the 2nd and the 3rd. The sprint also happens to overlap with the Bolsena Online Code Sprint 2020, so we’ll end up sharing some of the infrastructure and enjoying the good company of other sprinters! This sprint revives and seeks to improve the old monthly bug fix code sprint, that we used to do before. From those sprints, we learned that bugs that can be assigned to less experienced developers, because they seem like a one day fix, are hard to find. That was often coupled with lower participation of experienced developers, who need to review the pull requests for the fixes, and sit on the side (now virtually) of other developers to provide guidance.

So this time the sprint is two days long. We hope to get more tickets looked at, while allowing participant developers to tackle harder to fix problems.

Please join us on the GeoServer gitter channel, and don’t forget to go say hi to the other Bolsena sprinters on the OSGeo/Sprint channel!

Cordially,

Luis 320x100_eng]]>
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State of GeoNode 3.0 Free Webinar https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/state-geonode-3-webinar/ https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/state-geonode-3-webinar/#comments Tue, 23 Jun 2020 13:16:29 +0000 http://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/?p=5333 GeoNode pic

Dear Reader,

One of the core technologies in a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) is a catalog. It’s like a town center where food providers and food consumers meet. Shoppers walk around and visually or by smelling they discover the food they want. They engage in a small chat and if they agree with the price they buy it. In the case of an SDI, a catalog is the virtual place where data providers and data consumers meet.  Data consumers discover resources and via rich descriptions (metadata) and previews,  they make a decision about using or not a particular data or service. However, not all organizations have implemented a catalog  and in the case of a disaster, discovery of data is still a big issue as highlighted in the recently published OGC Development of Disaster Spatial Data Infrastructures for Disaster Resilience Engineering Report.

Discovery of data is only part of the challenge. Once you find the service or dataset, you want to access it and use it. If the resource is not available via open standards, like the ones promoted by OGC and ISO, then it's like buying a piece of bread that you can only cut with one knife. It becomes frustrating and expensive to buy this kind of bread!

What if you are a data provider and in minutes you can register your data or service on the web, add metadata to it, and immediately have it available via open standards? This is what GeoNode does pretty well. It’s a content management system for geospatial, build on open standards and open source. It powers lots of Spatial Data Infrastructures in the world. For example GeoSolutions has helped install GeoNode in various countries (Malaway, Afghanistan, Mozambique, Ghana, Uganda, Nepal, and Madagascar).

The World Bank, in particular, has greatly supported its development and even published a report about the return over investment they encountered when investing in the development of GeoNode. A great blog about it is available at the World Bank web site. So, with all these said, GeoNode 3.0 was released about a month ago.  See GeoNode blog for complete details. There is usually a presentation GeoSolutions does at  the FOSS4G meeting and at  the GeoNode summit about the latest release, but unfortunately the two meetings were cancelled, so we are doing  a free webinar on July 7th at  11:00 Eastern Time. Some highlights of what’s new:

- GeoNode components have been updated to new versions: Python upgrade 3.7, Django upgrade 2.2.12, GeoServer upgrade 2.16.2.

MapStore is now the default client greatly enriching the experience for viewing the data.

- Greatly improved analytics and getting information about who is visiting the website and their actions. For example, you can see unique visitors who trigger a specific type of event.

- Improved full GeoNode backup & restore.

- Extended GeoNode shared permission via GeoLimits to restrict users or groups to a specific geographical area (see below).

[caption id="attachment_5335" align="aligncenter" width="799"]geolimits GeoLimits at work for GeoNode 3[/caption]  

I just highlighted my favorite enhancements. To learn more about GeoNode 3,0 and enjoy a 20 minutes of Q&A time with our lead GeoNode Lead Developer Alessio Fabiani, Francesco Bartoli, as well as, Giovanni Allegri and Florian Hoedt also part of the GeoNode Project Steering Committee. I cordially invite you to a free webinar on July 7 at 11:00 Eastern Time by registering at the link below!

register
Hope to see you virtually on July 7th, meanwhile stay safe and keep strong! Cordially, Luis 320x100_eng]]>
GeoNode pic

Dear Reader,

One of the core technologies in a Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) is a catalog. It’s like a town center where food providers and food consumers meet. Shoppers walk around and visually or by smelling they discover the food they want. They engage in a small chat and if they agree with the price they buy it. In the case of an SDI, a catalog is the virtual place where data providers and data consumers meet.  Data consumers discover resources and via rich descriptions (metadata) and previews,  they make a decision about using or not a particular data or service. However, not all organizations have implemented a catalog  and in the case of a disaster, discovery of data is still a big issue as highlighted in the recently published OGC Development of Disaster Spatial Data Infrastructures for Disaster Resilience Engineering Report.

Discovery of data is only part of the challenge. Once you find the service or dataset, you want to access it and use it. If the resource is not available via open standards, like the ones promoted by OGC and ISO, then it's like buying a piece of bread that you can only cut with one knife. It becomes frustrating and expensive to buy this kind of bread!

What if you are a data provider and in minutes you can register your data or service on the web, add metadata to it, and immediately have it available via open standards? This is what GeoNode does pretty well. It’s a content management system for geospatial, build on open standards and open source. It powers lots of Spatial Data Infrastructures in the world. For example GeoSolutions has helped install GeoNode in various countries (Malaway, Afghanistan, Mozambique, Ghana, Uganda, Nepal, and Madagascar).

The World Bank, in particular, has greatly supported its development and even published a report about the return over investment they encountered when investing in the development of GeoNode. A great blog about it is available at the World Bank web site. So, with all these said, GeoNode 3.0 was released about a month ago.  See GeoNode blog for complete details. There is usually a presentation GeoSolutions does at  the FOSS4G meeting and at  the GeoNode summit about the latest release, but unfortunately the two meetings were cancelled, so we are doing  a free webinar on July 7th at  11:00 Eastern Time. Some highlights of what’s new:

- GeoNode components have been updated to new versions: Python upgrade 3.7, Django upgrade 2.2.12, GeoServer upgrade 2.16.2.

MapStore is now the default client greatly enriching the experience for viewing the data.

- Greatly improved analytics and getting information about who is visiting the website and their actions. For example, you can see unique visitors who trigger a specific type of event.

- Improved full GeoNode backup & restore.

- Extended GeoNode shared permission via GeoLimits to restrict users or groups to a specific geographical area (see below).

[caption id="attachment_5335" align="aligncenter" width="799"]geolimits GeoLimits at work for GeoNode 3[/caption]  

I just highlighted my favorite enhancements. To learn more about GeoNode 3,0 and enjoy a 20 minutes of Q&A time with our lead GeoNode Lead Developer Alessio Fabiani, Francesco Bartoli, as well as, Giovanni Allegri and Florian Hoedt also part of the GeoNode Project Steering Committee. I cordially invite you to a free webinar on July 7 at 11:00 Eastern Time by registering at the link below!

register
Hope to see you virtually on July 7th, meanwhile stay safe and keep strong! Cordially, Luis 320x100_eng]]>
https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/state-geonode-3-webinar/feed/ 1
Upcoming Webinar: Best Practices for Optimizing Performance with GeoServer https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/geoserver-performance-2020-webinar/ https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/geoserver-performance-2020-webinar/#comments Thu, 28 May 2020 15:59:17 +0000 http://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/?p=5293 GeoServer

Dear Reader,

One of the main goals of GeoSolutions customers is to improve performance of their geospatial server. We have been improving open source tools (e.g. GeoServer and GeoWebCache) to allow for proper dissemination of large geospatial datasets in private and public cloud environments. In this post, I highlight some tricks and tips to improve performance and I also cordially invite you to a webinar on June 10th 11:00-12:00 EDT / 15:00 GMT, led by our GeoServer lead developer Andrea Aime. Check other time zones here

We want to enable a client to play with maps backed by millions of geometries or terabytes of images. Proper configuration of GeoServer and the data, in particular for large datasets, will keep us in the happy zone! GeoServer has been improving over the years and more options are available to the administrators to tweak its configuration. A blog posted two years ago, provides some tweaking details. Lots of things have changed since then. For example, back then the Marlin renderer was not part of the JAVA JDK. Now it is part of JDK-9 onwards (See a JaveOne presentation from Bourges about this topic). You don’t need to do this extra configuration. If you are running on JDK-8 then follow the recommendations on the blog to improve the performance when rendering images. So, what do you do if you have a ½ terabyte of OSM data and want to use it as a basemap, or you want to show on a map data from areas of interest that are tessellated in grid cells with very high resolution, or you want to cache layer groups containing thousands of GeoTIFFs (e.g. see thread on gis.stackexchange)? The strategies and tricks revolve on minimizing the work to be performed by GeoServer and the database once a request is being made. This requires preparing as much as possible data in advance, selecting best formats, caching, and other strategies.  I will provide key strategies in this post, as an introduction to the topic.
[caption id="attachment_5304" align="aligncenter" width="936"]Server performance Server performance[/caption]

Can I portray millions of geometries in my web client?

Let’s say you have an area composed of 1 million geometries. You are not always going to show everything. You pick and choose what you want to present depending on the zoom levels. This can be tricky because you also need to process the attribute data from the contained geometries (e.g. adding, averaging). There is this kind of illusion that the user is getting all the data all the time. The magic is done via a smart setup on the backend to minimize the features being retrieved.  Several approaches to tackle this issue:

1) Reduce the number of features being returned. You want super fast performance, present maximum 1000 features.

Pre-configure and select what to show at different levels (e.g. via style optimizations). As the user zooms-in, the data presented changes. New features and new labels might show-up, while others disappear.

data-simplification Create bigger geometries that are composed of smaller geometries. The geometries returned depend on the zoom level of the request or the information of the request. When done properly discrete grids are an incredible mechanism to compute fast analytics. A good read about this topic is the  OGC Discrete Global Grid System (DGGS). There is also related work going on, which we are helping to advance, as part of the  OGC Testbed 16.

2) Simplify the vertices of the polygon. For example, if a polygon has 500,000 vertices at a higher zoom level the same polygon can be represented in hundreds of vertices and the end user should not notice the difference. The tutorial for using GeoTools Feature-pregenralized module explains this in detail.

Can I serve petabytes of raster data with GeoServer?

The answer is yes, but you need to properly configure them. Regarding formats GeoTIFF is the champion. It is very flexible, can be tiled and can be fined tuned for performance.  

How do you structure a GeoTIFF? There are several structures such as structuring the data in a Single GeoTiff, in a Mosaic or in a Pyramid.

  [caption id="attachment_5302" align="aligncenter" width="936"]GeoTIFF Structures GeoTIFF Structures[/caption]

The structure strategy basically depends on the size of the data, and the dimensions. 

  • If single granules are < 20 Gb, using Single GeoTiffs are a good choice.
  • If files are > 20 Gb or you have too many dimensions (e.g. numerical models might have multiple times, elevation and others), then use ImageMosaics.
  • If the dataset if tremendously large and the data needs to be served at different resolutions, then ImagePyramid is the best option.
With the above approaches we have served satellite imagery covering the entire planet, as well as long time series of meteorological models, and the like, up to several petabytes of backend data.

As said before, I have only provided some tips and tricks in this post. Don’t miss our webinar and register, so you will have the opportunity to hear more about this topic and ask anything you want to Andrea.

register

Hope to see you virtually on June 10th, meanwhile stay safe and keep strong!

Cordially,

Luis 320x100_eng]]>
GeoServer

Dear Reader,

One of the main goals of GeoSolutions customers is to improve performance of their geospatial server. We have been improving open source tools (e.g. GeoServer and GeoWebCache) to allow for proper dissemination of large geospatial datasets in private and public cloud environments. In this post, I highlight some tricks and tips to improve performance and I also cordially invite you to a webinar on June 10th 11:00-12:00 EDT / 15:00 GMT, led by our GeoServer lead developer Andrea Aime. Check other time zones here

We want to enable a client to play with maps backed by millions of geometries or terabytes of images. Proper configuration of GeoServer and the data, in particular for large datasets, will keep us in the happy zone! GeoServer has been improving over the years and more options are available to the administrators to tweak its configuration. A blog posted two years ago, provides some tweaking details. Lots of things have changed since then. For example, back then the Marlin renderer was not part of the JAVA JDK. Now it is part of JDK-9 onwards (See a JaveOne presentation from Bourges about this topic). You don’t need to do this extra configuration. If you are running on JDK-8 then follow the recommendations on the blog to improve the performance when rendering images. So, what do you do if you have a ½ terabyte of OSM data and want to use it as a basemap, or you want to show on a map data from areas of interest that are tessellated in grid cells with very high resolution, or you want to cache layer groups containing thousands of GeoTIFFs (e.g. see thread on gis.stackexchange)? The strategies and tricks revolve on minimizing the work to be performed by GeoServer and the database once a request is being made. This requires preparing as much as possible data in advance, selecting best formats, caching, and other strategies.  I will provide key strategies in this post, as an introduction to the topic.
[caption id="attachment_5304" align="aligncenter" width="936"]Server performance Server performance[/caption]

Can I portray millions of geometries in my web client?

Let’s say you have an area composed of 1 million geometries. You are not always going to show everything. You pick and choose what you want to present depending on the zoom levels. This can be tricky because you also need to process the attribute data from the contained geometries (e.g. adding, averaging). There is this kind of illusion that the user is getting all the data all the time. The magic is done via a smart setup on the backend to minimize the features being retrieved.  Several approaches to tackle this issue:

1) Reduce the number of features being returned. You want super fast performance, present maximum 1000 features.

Pre-configure and select what to show at different levels (e.g. via style optimizations). As the user zooms-in, the data presented changes. New features and new labels might show-up, while others disappear.

data-simplification Create bigger geometries that are composed of smaller geometries. The geometries returned depend on the zoom level of the request or the information of the request. When done properly discrete grids are an incredible mechanism to compute fast analytics. A good read about this topic is the  OGC Discrete Global Grid System (DGGS). There is also related work going on, which we are helping to advance, as part of the  OGC Testbed 16.

2) Simplify the vertices of the polygon. For example, if a polygon has 500,000 vertices at a higher zoom level the same polygon can be represented in hundreds of vertices and the end user should not notice the difference. The tutorial for using GeoTools Feature-pregenralized module explains this in detail.

Can I serve petabytes of raster data with GeoServer?

The answer is yes, but you need to properly configure them. Regarding formats GeoTIFF is the champion. It is very flexible, can be tiled and can be fined tuned for performance.  

How do you structure a GeoTIFF? There are several structures such as structuring the data in a Single GeoTiff, in a Mosaic or in a Pyramid.

  [caption id="attachment_5302" align="aligncenter" width="936"]GeoTIFF Structures GeoTIFF Structures[/caption]

The structure strategy basically depends on the size of the data, and the dimensions. 

  • If single granules are < 20 Gb, using Single GeoTiffs are a good choice.
  • If files are > 20 Gb or you have too many dimensions (e.g. numerical models might have multiple times, elevation and others), then use ImageMosaics.
  • If the dataset if tremendously large and the data needs to be served at different resolutions, then ImagePyramid is the best option.
With the above approaches we have served satellite imagery covering the entire planet, as well as long time series of meteorological models, and the like, up to several petabytes of backend data.

As said before, I have only provided some tips and tricks in this post. Don’t miss our webinar and register, so you will have the opportunity to hear more about this topic and ask anything you want to Andrea.

register

Hope to see you virtually on June 10th, meanwhile stay safe and keep strong!

Cordially,

Luis 320x100_eng]]>
https://www.geosolutionsgroup.com/news/geoserver-performance-2020-webinar/feed/ 6